Byzantium's Shores: chronicling the misadventures of an overalls-clad hippie

Homepage  Xml - Vorschau mit Bildern

Bad Joke Friday
Bad Joke Dog

Something for Thursday
You know what? You look like you could use a half hour of Mozart. So here.(And if you don't think you could use a half hour of Mozart? Shut up and listen to a half hour of Mozart.)

Tone Poem Tuesday
Stretching the idea of the "tone poem" somewhat, here is Alexander Glazunov again, this time looking back in time rather than east in direction. This orchestral suite is called "From the Middle Ages," and it is just that: a musical depiction, in Glazunov's thinking, of the climate of medieval Europe. There are big melodic strokes here, to be sure (this is a Russian Romantic, after all), but there are also intimate expressions of medieval dance, the songs of the troubadours, and the marching of the knights off to Crusade. At times this piece almost evokes for me the finest in film music.Here is Glazunov's suite "From the Middle Ages."

Something for Thursday
Today is National Holocaust Remembrance Day.It's not enough to remember that it happened. We must remember why.

Tone Poem Tuesday
There is something oddly seductive about the way the Russian Romantic composers, while trained in the musical traditions of the west, often looked eastward for inspiration. That exotic flavor lives so sparklingly in the work of Rimsky-Korsakov and Borodin, and is also found in the works of other Russians of the time, such as Alexander Glazunov. This work here, the Oriental Rhapsody, sounds like it belongs on a program of such music alongside Scheherazade and In the Steppes of Central Asia. It's a musical tribute to an Asia-that-never-was, born in a time when the word "Orient" was used to sum up virtually a third of the entire world and all the peoples therein. There's no real depiction of an actual Asia here, just an imagined one...but the imagination is powerful.Here is Glazunov's Oriental Rhapsody.

Doggos
Just because, here are some photos of the dogs.(I'll take more of the cats soon.)

Bad Joke Friday
Wow, I need to get back into the swing over here, don't I? Here's something! It's not even a bad joke. I liked it, actually!(via)

Something for Thursday
I really love the movie Catch Me If You Can. One reason is John Williams's wonderful score, with its mix of caper-jazz and its wistful tone depicting Frank Abagnale's (Leonardo DiCaprio) unspoken wish for some kind of normal life. Williams edited his masterful score, one of his most underrated gems, into this suite.

Something for Thursday
A very young Judy Garland--even before she would travel over that rainbow--sings to a photograph of Clark Gable.

Tone Poem Tuesday
Max Reger was a late-Romantic era composer who isn't heard a lot these days, owing to his reputation of having written mostly very dense works that aren't the easiest listens in the world. I'm all for difficult listening, but I'm not sold on Reger, whose work strikes me (based on what little I've heard) as very heavy and ponderous. But I'll let you all be the judge: here is Reger's Symphonic prologue for a tragedy.

Running Hound
I've always found it hard to get really nice pictures of Cane as he's running. From certain angles a greyhound running is a magical thing, but from others they look like a randomized collection of overlong limbs flailing in every direction.I finally got lucky a couple of weeks ago.In other news, it appears that springtime may actually be in the offing. I try to not be overly optimistic on this point, but...well, I can hope, too.And yes, Carla is still here, and yes, she still loves her brother.Dogs, man. What a life development this has been!

Something for Thursday
It's been a busy week...but not so busy that we can't take some time for Itzhak Perlman playing Bizet by way of Pablo de Sarasate.

Something for Friday
Sorry I didn't get around to posting yesterday, but here is a bit of film music from a movie that is one of the better ones out there at depicting the sense of wonder and grandeur in the universe that science can illuminate. The film is Contact, and I offer this in memory of Stephen Hawking, who died the day before yesterday (on Pi Day, and Albert Einstein's birthday, for a couple of odd synchronicities). Hawking was a complicated person, as most are, but his contributions to science cannot be diminished. He is now one of the "Giants" upon whose shoulders future generations will stand.

Three One Four
It's Pi Day, everyone!It is also Albert Einstein's birthday and, sadly, this year's edition marks the passing of Stephen Hawking, about which I'll have more to say later. But for now, let's celebrate Pi!Calculate Pi yourself!NASA's Pi in the Sky ChallengeA few videos:(That one's titled "Pi Day" but the video has nothing to do with Pi so far as I can see, but it's a cool video anyway, so there it is.)And finally:Happy Pi Day, everyone!

Tone Poem Tuesday
Film music is often rearranged by the composers into suites that make for better performance in concert settings, and this is one of the better ones. I had this performance on a cassette tape many moons ago, but I never was able to track it down on CD...and then I happened to find it on Google Play the other day. Lo and behold, here it is on YouTube: a suite of John Williams's music to Close Encounters of the Third Kind, performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and conducted by Zubin Mehta. This was recorded way back in 1978, before Mehta made his name in a big way as music director of the New York Philharmonic.Enjoy!


1 2