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Climate change makes freak Siberian heat 600 times likelier
International scientists released a study Wednesday that found the greenhouse effect multiplied the chance of the region's prolonged heat by at least 600 times, and maybe tens of thousands of times.

UN: World could hit 1.5-degree warming threshold in 5 years
The World Meteorological Organization said there is a 20 per cent chance that the 1.5 C level will be reached in at least one year between 2020 and 2024. The period is expected to see annual average temperatures that are 0.91 C to 1.59 C higher than pre-industrial averages.

UN: World could hit 1.5-degree warming threshold in 5 years
The world could see average global temperatures 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) above the pre-industrial average for the first time in the coming five years, the UN weather agency said Thursday.

UN forecasts even warmer temperatures over next 5 years
The annual mean global temperature is likely to be at least one degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels in each of the next five years, the World Meteorological Organization said Thursday.​

Climate change turning US mountain lakes green with algae
Global warming is turning clear mountain lakes green in the western United States because of an increase in algae blooms "without historical precedent", researchers reported on Tuesday.

Siberian temperatures hit June record, fires spread: EU data
Temperatures in Arctic Siberia soared to a record average for June amid a heat wave that is stoking some of the worst wildfires the region has ever known. Global temperatures last month were on par with a 2019 record, and "exceptional warmth" was recorded over Arctic Siberia.

Thunberg has hope for climate, despite leaders' inaction


Global CO2 emissions to drop 4-7% in 2020, but will it matter?
In early April, coronavirus lockdowns led to a 17 percent reduction worldwide in carbon pollution compared to the same period last year, according to the first peer-reviewed assessment of the pandemic's impact on CO2 emissions, published in Nature Climate Change.

Last year was Europeís hottest on record, even without El Nino: Scientists
Europe's average annual temperature hit a record high last year, exceeding the previous hottest years on record, which were 2014, 2015 and 2018, the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), said in its annual "European State of the Climate" report.

Coronavirus forces UN body to postpone its flagship climate meet COP26
The COVID-19 spread has forced the UN body to postpone its flagship annual climate change conference which was scheduled to be held at Glasgow in United Kingdom (UK) in November. This crucial meet will now be held in 2021 -- the first year of the operationalisation of the the Paris Agreement.

Why virus may bring plastic back in favour


By ignoring climate emergency, world leaders are forcing children to act: Greta Thunberg
"Our leaders behave like children so it falls to us to be the adults in the room. They are failing us but we will not back down," said Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg on Friday addressing some 20,000 people at the Bristol Youth Strike 4 Climate (BY24C) event. She said the "uncomfortable truth" was being swept "under the rug" for "children to clean up".

Snowfall may be key to why some Himalayan glaciers arenít melting
Global warming is shrinking glaciers across the world, whether in the Alps or the Himalayas. Except in one spot: the Karokaram mountain range in the northwest Himalayas

Amazon boss Bezos launches $10 bn fund to combat climate change
"Climate change is the biggest threat to our planet. I want to work alongside others, both to amplify known ways and to explore new ways of fighting the devastating impact of climate change,' said Bezos who is worth $130 billion.

Jeff Bezos commits $10 billion to fight climate change
Amazon founder Jeff Bezos said Monday that he plans to spend $10 billion of his own fortune to help fight climate change. Bezos, the world's richest person, said in an Instagram post that he'll start giving grants this summer to scientists, activists and nonprofits working to protect Earth. Bezos said that he will call his new initiative the Bezos Earth Fund.


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